JC Lupis | Marketing Charts | Fri, 26 Aug 2016 13:00:46 +0000

Local media users in the US tend to view print ads as more useful than annoying, but aren’t quite as sure about digital ads, according to a study [pdf] from AMG/Parade. Point-of-sale circulars are among the most positively viewed ads, with 52% seeing them as useful compared to just 6% finding them annoying.AMGParade-Local-Media-Ad-Channels-Aug2016

Newspaper inserts/circulars (48% useful) and ads in printed newspapers (47% useful) are next on the list of the most broadly valuable channels, per the survey, with these also on the bottom rung of “annoying” channels.

By contrast, ads on non-media social sites are as likely to be viewed as annoying as they are to be seen as useful, with a similar split for ads on radio websites/social sites.

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Not too surprisingly, the advertising channels that local media users are most favorable towards also are among the ones to which they ascribe the most purchase influence. The leading advertising vehicle in terms of stated purchase influence is newspaper inserts/circulars, which 53% of respondents said often lead them to purchase products and services. Close behind, point-of-sale circulars are considered the next-most influential, with almost half (48%) saying they often make purchases as a result of them. These are followed by circulars delivered to the home (41%), indicating that circulars maintain wide appeal among their users.

Nevertheless, the results bring to mind previous research indicating that circulars and flyers have a strong influence on household shopping behaviors.

Towards the bottom of the list of local media purchase influencers are TV commercials (29%), radio commercials (24%) and ads in printed magazines (22%).

It’s worth noting that the responses regarding purchase influence are among users of these specific local media rather than the entire sample, such that they’re not affected by questions of reach.

These are interesting results when compared to MarketingCharts’ national survey of purchase influencers, which found TV ads maintaining their top billing among paid media. The MarketingCharts study also found radio and magazines to be further down the list, but that appeared to be primarily due to a lack of reach (particularly for magazines).

The differences in the results could be due to the nature of the advertising and the medium. Newspapers are likely to target local areas to a greater extent than magazines, with TV also probably more of a national medium (despite the presence of local channels). The strong influence of circulars is also likely due to them featuring local offers.

Interestingly, however, separate results from the AMG report indicate that local media users are more likely to feel that TV ads (32%) have the “best sales and deals” for the products they shop for than point-of-sale circulars (17%). Nevertheless, newspapers topped the list of ads with the best sales and deals as well as another list of preferred sources of information about products, brands and local companies.

No wonder then that newspaper inserts/circulars and ads in print newspapers were 2 of the top 4 most influential advertising sources for local media users…

For an in-depth examination of purchase influencers on a national scale – broken down by gender, generation and household income – see MarketingCharts’ 3rd annual “Advertising Channels With the Largest Influence on Consumers” research study.

About the Data: AMG/Parade describes its methodology as follows:

“AMG/Parade commissioned Coda Ventures LLC, an independent market research firm, to conduct a survey of American consumers to identify the role that local media play in providing community news and information, and delivering local advertising.

Employing an online methodology, potential respondents were screened by core demographic characteristics that matched national U.S. Census estimates. The study was fielded from June 15-20, 2016. At the close of the survey, a total of 1,003 local media users were surveyed.”