JC Lupis | Marketing Charts | Fri, 10 Oct 2014 14:01:34 +0000

Half of teen spending is concentrated in 3 categories, reports Piper Jaffray in its latest “Taking Stock With Teens” survey. Clothing (21%) and food (20%) occupy the largest portions of the teen wallet, followed by accessories/personal care (10%), car (9%) and shoes (9%). Looking back over the past decade, the survey notes that clothing’s wallet share has dropped, while food and electronics have grown. Parents contributed roughly two-thirds of teen spending, per the latest report.PiperJaffray-US-Teens-Wallet-Share-by-Category-Oct2014

Here are some more pieces of research to mull over this weekend:

  • Almost 7 in 10 consumers would leave a meeting or shop online during a meeting to get a limited-time offer, according to a Clustrix survey [download page] that also finds online food ordering to be quite popular. Intershop has more statistics related to e-food trends here.
  • Some 56% of IT decision-makers have seen an increase in email spam levels over the past year versus just 13% seeing a decrease, finds a GFI Software survey. 7 in 10 respondents – all from organizations with between 5 and 1,000 employees – reported having their day-to-day business operations affected by spam at some point during the past year.
  • Smartphone penetration reached 72% of the US mobile subscriber market during the 3-month period ending in August, reports comScore.
  • Mobile video ad spending in the UK tripled year-over-year in H1, and mobile now accounts for one-fifth of digital ad spend and 53% of social media spending, per the IAB UK.
  • Sticking with the UK, a Thinkbox study finds that multi-screening during ad breaks is common, but does not affect ad recall. Similar results have been reported in the US.
  • China has surpassed the US as the world’s largest economy (burying the lede?!), says the Financial Times [registration required], using IMF data that takes into account purchasing power parity (PPP).

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