The continued rise of smartphones and tablets is curtailing the growth of other devices, new research suggests. Today, 73% of U.S. adults own a desktop or laptop, which is down from a high of 80% in2012, according to Pew. Smartphones are transforming into all-purpose devices that perform many of the same functions of specialized technology.

Source: Smartphones Transform Usage, Redefine Gadget Popularity 10/30/2015

The continued rise of smartphones and tablets is curtailing the growth of other devices, new research suggests.

Today, 73% of U.S. adults own a desktop or laptop, which is down from a high of 80% in 2012, according to Pew Research Center.

E-reader ownership is also down from 32% in 2014 to a present share of 19% among U.S. adults.

Plus, 40% of adults still own an MP3 player, which is down from the high mark of 47% in 2010.

“These data suggest how the rise of smartphones has been a major story in the universe of connected gadgetry,” Lee Rainie, Director of Internet, Science and Technology Research at Pew Research Center, explains in the new report.

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“These changes in device ownership are all taking place in a world where smartphones are transforming into all-purpose devices that perform many of the same functions of specialized technology, such as music players, e-book readers or even gaming devices.”

Indeed, more than two-thirds (68%) of U.S. adults now own a smartphone, according to Pew. That is nearly double the 35% of U.S. adult who owned a smartphone just four years ago.

Presently, Pew found that a full 92% of U.S. adults own some sort of mobile phone, smart or not — up from 65% in 2004. Today, 86% of U.S. consumers ages 18-to-29 have a smartphone, along with 83% of those ages 30-to-49, and 87% of those living in households earning $75,000 or more annually.

As for tablets, 45% of U.S. adults now own at least one such gadget, which is up significantly from 4% in 2010.

Also of note, 40% of adults report owning a gaming console — a share that has not changes in five years.

Pew’s analysis was based mostly on telephone interviews conducted earlier in the year among a national sample of 1,907 U.S. adults.

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