JC Lupis | Marketing Charts | Fri, 22 Apr 2016 13:30:45 +0000

Some 74% of adult mobile device owners claim to want to receive messages from a store or business during a visit, per a survey of 2,115 US adults (18+) from Euclid Analytics. However, giving consent and choosing when messages are received are important to a sizable share of respondents, although the medium (how they receive the messages) appears to be the most important factor.Euclid-Most-Impt-In-Store-Messaging-Factors-Apr2016

Previous research on this topic has yielded conflicting results: that in-store alerts are both welcomed and annoying.

The following is a brief list of intriguing data points sourced from recent research.

  • While smartphone owners continue to have a strong appetite for content on their devices – such as watching video (81% doing so) and playing online games (69%) – they are also facing some frustrating challenges, per a report from Accenture. For example, more than 8 in 10 are unhappy with mobile advertising interfering with their experience, more than 6 in 10 are concerned about the security of financial transactions conducted over their devices, and 60% are dissatisfied with their connectivity and experience and would switch providers. The results are based off a survey of 28,000 consumers in 28 global markets.
  • They may be unhappy with their experiences, but smartphone owners – as noted above in the Accenture survey – are pressing forward with their use of their devices for digital content. In fact, according to a survey from Limelight Networks [pdf], the mobile phone has now narrowly displaced the personal computer as the device to which American adults most often download content. As relates to the content downloaded, the results indicate that movies and TV shows, new apps/updates to apps and music are the most frequently downloaded content types. The most frustrating thing about downloading content, per the survey, is the length of time it takes to complete, though interruptions are also frustrating to many.
  • Netflix has overtaken HBO for the first time as the premium TV or subscription video-on-demand service that Americans perceive to have the “best” original content, per a Morgan Stanley survey reported here by Variety. Separate results from the survey show that original content is a major factor in continued membership for 45% of Netflix subscribers, up from 34% last year. Interestingly, Netflix subscribers are heavy media consumers, being more likely to subscribe to HBO, Showtime and Starz than non-Netflix subscribers.
  • Marketers’ biggest concerns when investing in content are gaining deeper insights beyond clicks and views (59%) and being able to accurately measure ROI (58%), with fewer concerned with measuring content-driven conversion behavior or deeper content engagement. That’s according to a survey of 500 marketers from Rapt Media, which also found that 60% of business marketers are unable to measure ROI on the content they produce. That brings to mind recent research from Rundown, in which only 18% of content marketers reported a clear understanding of the ROI their content delivers.
  • Retailers are failing to meet customers’ expectations, averaging an overall performance score of 40% on four core competencies: consistency; content; convenience; and context. That’s according to an IBM evaluation of 550 brick-and-mortar and pure play retailers across 8 different segments and 23 countries. Retailers fared worst in the contextual criteria, as fewer than 1 in 5 analyzed provide personalized name, product content and marketing messages in at least one digital touchpoint.
  • Close to half (45%) of Americans reported traveling by air last year, and a majority (53%) say they are likely to fly this year, finds Ipsos in a survey conducted for Airlines for America. Overall, more than 8 in 10 airline travelers report being satisfied with their air travel experience, with Millennials (18-34) being the most satisfied (88%).

Have a great weekend!

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